Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference on Medical Informatics & Telemedicine Prague, Czech Republic.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Daniel DuBravec

LMI, USA

Keynote: Integrating predictive analytics and telemedicine with the EHR

Time : 09:30-10:10

OMICS International Medical Informatics 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Daniel DuBravec photo
Biography:

Dan DuBravec is a senior consultant at LMI, a not-for-profit consulting firm headquartered in the Washington, D.C. area. Mr. DuBravec leads IT implementation projects and holds multiple EHR certifications, as well as a BS in product design from Illinois State University and an MS in educational technology leadership from George Washington University. His published articles on EHRs and Genomic data have been featured in the Journal of AHIMA (American Health Information Management Association). He is currently working with George Mason University on a research project focused on the Shareability and Accessibility to Big Genomic Data. 

 

Abstract:

Healthcare providers are turning to predictive analytics technology and then integrating it with telemedicine to collect data from physician/patient video conferences, email and IoT monitoring for irregular vital signs. The aggregation and analysis of this data determines the best approach to improved clinical care. By predictively identifying patients at elevated risk, remote patient encounters will reduce repeated re-admission to hospitals and lower patient costs. The benefits are many, but Health IT administrators must be diligent in implementing and maintaining privacy standards and policies which protect patient health data.  Policies, procedures, rules and roles must be part of an overall data governance strategy for telemedicine and patient analytics.

Massive amounts of clinical data are now being ingested into electronic health records (EHRs), ranging from ultrasound, X-ray, CT and MRI images, coupled with patient medical history, and most recently, genomic information. The centralization of patient information into health data lakes is creating vast amounts of unstructured information.  This data will be used to create comprehensive predictive models and then pulled into EHRs, accelerating automated clinical support with life-saving interventions.

The most promising application of telemedicine and predictive analytics has been its impact on improving the quality of care in rural areas of the United States. Evidence suggests that the use of telemedicine results in a decreased need for in-person follow-up visits with medical providers. When physician specialists for personalized medical needs are required, and the patient lives in a rural area, telemedicine provides remote medical consultation within the comfort of the patient’s home. By allowing physicians to monitor their patients' health on an on going basis remotely, and then analyzing this data, illness is treated early on before it becomes life-threatening. In addition to the convenience and insights tele-predictive modeling creates, there is a reduction in the overall cost of care.

Recent Publications:

  1. Payne, T. H., Corley, S., Cullen, T. A., Gandhi, T. K., Harrington, L., Kuperman, G. J., Zaroukian, M. H. (2015, May 29). Report of the AMIA EHR 2020 task force on the status and future direction of EHRs. Retrieved from Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: http://jamia.oxfordjournals.org/content/earl /2015/08/14/jamia.ocv066.
  2. Reed, T. (2014, February 28). Genomics 2.0: Putting Inova on the map. Retrieved from Washington Business Journal: http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/print edition/2014/02/28/genomics-20-putting-inova-on-the-map.
  3. Russo, J. E., McCool, R. R., & Davies, L. (2016, March 14). VA Telemedicine: An
  4. Analysis of Cost and Time Savings. Telemedicine and e-Health, 209-215.
  5. Schadelbauer, R. (2017, March). Anticipating Economic Returns of Rural Telehealth. Arlington, VA: The Rural Broadband Association. Retrieved from Foundation for Rural Service.

Keynote Forum

Jonathon Guyer

St Cloud VA Health Care System, USA

Keynote: Patient support for electronic health care technologies

Time : 10:10-10:50

OMICS International Medical Informatics 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jonathon Guyer photo
Biography:

Jonathon C Guyer, PMP. Enjoy and excel in developing leading-edge, innovative customer-service programs that incorporate pioneering uses of technology. Proficient at bringing key stakeholders to pivotal meetings to develop efficient, collaborative processes that benefit all participants. Skilled at coaching patients and staff in effective communication and ethical work practices. Excel in developing creative solutions for health information exchange implementation.

 

 

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Patients most in need of medical care are the least likely to use electronic medical technologies. The purpose of Health Hub is to bridge a gap between patients needing assistance and the medical programs available.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation:  New patients are scheduled for a 15-minute Health Hub appointment. At any time patients can request an in person or over the phone assistance. Clinicians refer patients to the Health Hub for information, support and enrolment. 

Findings: Patients without computer proficiency are less likely to use the new medical technologies. Empowerment and support increases patient program engagement and efficiencies.

Conclusion & Significance: Computer and mobile support increases likelihood of program use. In turn, increases patient wellness and reduces health care costs.

Recent Publications:

  1. Urmimala Sarkar (2010) The Literacy Divide: Health Literacy and the Use of an Internet based Patient Portal in an Integrated Health System-Results from the Diabetes Study of Northern California. Journal of Health Communication 15: 183-196.
  2. Ruiz, G. MD (2006) The Impact of E-Learning in Medical Education. Academic Medicine. 81: 207-212.
  3. Alquraini, H (2007), Factors influencing nurses’ attitudes towards the use of computerized health information systems in Kuwaiti hospitals. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 57: 375–381. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04113.x.
  4. Peterson, Michael W. MD (2004) Medical Students’ Use of Information Resources: Is the Digital Age Dawning? AM; 79: 89-95.
  5. Annette De Vito Dabbs, RN, PhD (2009) User-Centered Design and Interactive Health Technologies for Patients 27(3): 175.

 

Keynote Forum

Marion Ben Jacob & David Wang

Mercy College, USA

Keynote: Assessment of telemedicine from different perspectives

Time : 11:05-11:45

OMICS International Medical Informatics 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marion Ben Jacob & David Wang photo
Biography:

Marion Ben Jacob has a Ph.D. in theoretical mathematics and is ABD in computer science. She is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences at Mercy College for over 36 years. She teaches courses in mathematics and computer science, both in the traditional classroom and online. She has published articles on, assessment, mathematics, computer science, computer ethics, pedagogy, online teaching/distance education, collaborative learning, and global learning. She is the editor and a contributing author of Integrating Computer Ethics across the Curriculum. She is the author of an e-book, Computer Ethics: Integrating across the Curriculum.

David Wang, M.S, is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Mercy College. He has led several NSF STEM and Microsoft grants totaling more than $1,000,000. He has served on the Content Advisory Committee for New York State Teacher Certification., as well on the Computer Science Review Committee for the joint ACM & IEEE 2001 Curriculum Project. As Associate Dean of School of Liberal Arts, he was a member of college-wide strategic planning committee and led the school’s academic program assessment efforts.  

Abstract:

Assessment is an important factor for improvement on the part of the users and stakeholders of telemedicine programs.  It provides feedback from which those involved can learn and make the necessary changes to enhance the operating environment.  This presentation will discuss the following aspects of assessment with regard to telemedicine:

1) Computing methodology and software systems, including the valuation of the different technologies used today: pro and con, and the issues and problems that presently exist and how to improve upon them and

(2) Ethics, including the assessment of clinical practices, e.g. the delay in treatment, compromised databases, doctor-patient relationship, equity of access, and threats to privacy and

 (3) Training of providers, including the design of courses.

With regard to the last subtopic, we will provide a somewhat innovative approach to assessment that will enhance the preparation of telemedicine providers for future success as creative and analytic providers of the future. The presentation will address the classification and goals of standard approaches to assessment, and a model of how to accomplish the aforementioned inventive approach, and its relation to mathematical concepts.

Recent Publications:

1. Ben-Jacob, Marion. (2017). Assessment: Classic and Innovative Approaches. Open Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.5 No.1. Accessed at http://www.scirp.org/journal/JSS/.

2. Ben-Jacob, Marion. (2014).Assessment: Categorizations, Supporting Technologies, and a Model for Betterment. Pensee         Journal (ISSN: 0031-4773), Vol. 76, Issue. 7. (with T. Ben Jacob).

3. Currell, R., Urquhart C, Wainwright P, et al. (2000). Telemedicine versus face-to-face patient care: Effects on professional practice and health outcomes. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2:CD002098.

4. Hailey D., Roine R., Ohinmaa, A.  (2002)A. Systematic review of evidence for the benefits of telemedicine. J Telemed Telecare, 8(Suppl 1):1-7. 5. Kidholm, K., Ekeland, A. Jensen, L., et al. (2012). A Model for assessment of Telemedicine Applications: MAST. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 28:1. 44–51.

  • Medical Informatics & Telemedicine | Healthcare Technologies | Public Health and Epidemiology | Biomedical Informatics | Health Information Technology
Location: Captain B+C
Speaker

Chair

Jonathon Guyer

St Cloud VA Health Care System, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Liudmila Ivanova

Kuban State Medical University, Russia

Session Introduction

Per Goran Kruger

University of Bergen, Norway

Title: Mast cells, the key to multiple sclerosis?

Time : 11:45-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Per Goran Kruger was born on 29.8.1941. Krüger 1968: Cand. Real (thesis: mast cells in the brain of the hedgehog winter/summer, female/male). NAVF-stipendiate at Pharmacology department Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden. Krüger is Prosector at institute For Anatomy, University of Bergen, Norway (1970), 1976: Dr. philos same place (thesis: Structural Changes of Rat Mast Cells in Relation to Histamine Release. (An in vitro study on the effects of ATP, toluidine blue and compound 48/80). He works ad Associate professor at Institute for Pathology, University of Washington, USA 1979-80. From1990-91 works as Associate professor at Moredun Research Institute, Edinburgh, Scotland. He works as Professor in cell biology, Institute of Anatomy at University of Bergen, Norway during 1994, Awarded students honor-prize as teacher at the preclinics, University of Bergen, Norway during 2002. Since 2011 he is Professor emeritus at Institute of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Norway.

Abstract:

Mast cells are not normally present in the unaffected human brain but were observed in the brains of MS-patients by Neumann 1890 (1).When applying  appropriate procedures it was demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells in MS autopsies far outnumbered what has earlier been observed and that the distribution and aggregation along venules within the MS- plaque border zones made it highly probable that, if stimulated, the released histamine would count for the observed oedemas which are normally observed within MS-brains (2). Further on it was demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells in the plaque-borderzones of females are approximately doubled from that in males (3), which may explain the fact that females are more inclined to developing MS than males. Mast cells may be stimulated by various stress phenomenon (4). Further; the normal relapsing - remitting phenomenon in MS may be explaind by the fact that stimulated mast cells do survive and within weeks/months may fully reload (5). Stimulation (relapsing phase), time for reloading (remitting phase), and so on.

Recent Publications:

1. Neumann, J. (1890) Über das Vorkommen der sogenannten “Mastzellen” bei Pathologischen Veränderung des Gehirns. Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für klinische Medicin. 122, 378 – 380.

2. Krüger, P.G. (2001) Mast cells and multiple sclerosis: a quantitative analysis. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology. 27, 275 – 280.

3. Krüger, P.G and Mørk S. (2012) Mast cells and multiple sclerosis in females and males. World journal of Neuroscience. 2, 145 – 149.

4. Pang, X. et al. (1998) A neurotensin receptor antagonist inhibits acute immo bilization stress induced cardiac mast cell degranulation, a corticotrophin- releasing hormone- depending process. J. Pharmacol Exp Ther Oct: 287(1), 307 – 314.

5. Krüger, P.G and Lagunoff, D. (1981) Mast cell restoration. A study of the rat peritoneal mast cells after depletion with plymyxin B. Int Arch allergy appl Immunol 65, 278 – 290.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ivanova L.A. was awarded the degree of Doctor of Sciences in February 2009. She was was awarded the academic title of professor of endocrinology in December 2009. She is the head of Endocrinology Department at Kuban State Medical University since 1995. She has published more than 123 articles and abstracts in Russian and international journals.

 

 

 

Abstract:

Many researchers believe that hyperinsulinemia is the main cause of the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The group of insulin sensitizers (biguanides, glitazones) has now been successfully used for treatment of hyperinsulinemia in patients with PCOS, contributing to the normalization of the menstrual cycle and fertility in more than half of the patients. 45 female patients with polycystic ovary syndrome took thioctic acid (Thioctacid-HR), 600 mg (n=25) or high protein diet (n=20). Fast insulin and glucose stimulus insulin were investigated before and after 3 months taken treatment. The use of thioctic acid, 600 mg is a new effective pathogenetics therapy of polycystic ovary syndrome on influence of hyperinsulinemia, HOMA-IR index and ovary volume in female patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Recent Publications:

  1. Azziz R (March 2006). «Diagnosis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: The Rotterdam Criteria Are Premature». Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism91(3): 781–5.DOI:10.1210/jc.2005-2153.PMID 16418211.
  2. Carmina E (February 2004). «Diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome: from NIH criteria to ESHRE-ASRM guidelines.». Minerva ginecologica56(1): 1–6.PMID 14973405.
  3. Hart R, Hickey M, Franks S (October 2004). «Definitions, prevalence and symptoms of polycystic ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome». Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology18(5): 671–83.DOI:10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2004.05.001.PMID 15380140.
  4. Nafiye Y, Sevtap K, Muammer D, Emre O, Senol K, Leyla M (April 2010). «The effect of serum and intrafollicular insulin resistance parameters and homocysteine levels of nonobese, nonhyperandrogenemic polycystic ovary syndrome patients on in vitro fertilization outcome». Fertil. Steril.93(6): 1864– 9.DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.12.024.PMID 19171332.
  5. Unfer V, Carlomagno G, Dante G, Facchinetti F. Effects of myo-inositol in women with PCOS: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2012;28(7):509-15.

Marina Frontasyeva

Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia

Title: Neutron activation analysis for medicinal plants

Time : 12:45-13:15

Speaker
Biography:

Marina Frontasyeva, Associate Professor, PhD in Physics and Mathematical Sciences, is an internationally recognized specialist in neutron activation analysis applied in the Life Sciences and Material Science carried out at the reactor IBR-2 of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (www.jinr.ru). She is the head of Sector of NAA and Applied Research at the FLNP JINR combining her activities with lecturing on nuclear methods for studying the environment at the Department of Chemistry of the International University of Nature, Society and Man of Dubna. She is a member of the International Committee on Activation Analysis (ICAA) and a Coordinator of the UNECE International Cooperative Program Vegetation (Moss Surveys) (in http://icpvegetation.ceh.ac.uk/) the framework of the Convention of the Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP). She is leader of numerous international projects coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the EU Programs. She is the author and co-author of more than 390 scientific publications (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marina_Frontasyeva2/contributions), her RG Score 39.84, h-index 29.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Traditional systems of medicine continue to be widely practiced for many reasons. Population growth, inadequate supply of drugs, side effects of most synthetic drugs and development of resistance to currently used drugs for infectious diseases have led to increased emphasis on the use of plant materials as a source of medicines for a wide variety of human ailments. Recently, WHO estimated that 80 per cent of people worldwide rely on herbal medicines for their primary health care needs. According to WHO, around 21,000 plant species have the potential for being used as medicinal plants. Over the past few decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of herbal medicine. However, there is still a significant lack of research data in this field.

The purpose of our studies is to establish a direct correlation between elemental content of medicinal plants and their curative ability which is not yet understood in terms of modern pharmacological concept. The quantitative estimation of various trace element concentrations is important for determining the effectiveness of the medicinal plants in treating various diseases and also to understand their pharmacological action. Moreover, trace elemental analysis of medicinal plants can be used to decide the dosage of the herbal drugs prepared from these plant materials.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a sensitive technique useful for quantitative multi-element analysis of major, minor, and trace elements present in various matrices. NAA offers sensitivities that are superior to those possible by all other analytical methods. Moreover, the accuracy and precision of the technique are such that NAA in 2007 has become one of the primary methods employed to certify the concentrations of elements in standard reference materials. The NAA technique involves the irradiation of a sample by neutrons to make the sample radioactive. After irradiation, the gamma rays emitted from the radioactive sample are measured to determine the amounts of different elements present in the sample. As a result, NAA has a number of advantages over most other analytical methods when investigating biological specimens. First, it is nearly free of any matrix interference effects because the vast majority of biological samples are transparent to the probe, the neutron, and the emitted analytical signal, the gamma ray. Second, because NAA can be applied instrumentally (without sample digestion or dissolution), there is little opportunity for reagent or laboratory contamination. Third, the preparation of samples from most matrices (especially biological sample types) for analysis by NAA is extremely easy: in most instances a portion of the sample need only be weighed and place in an appropriate container. The method is based on a relative standardization using high quality certified reference materials (CRMs).

Findings: NAA of different plants (herbs and woods) from Mongolia, India, Vietnam, Poland, Bulgaria, Portugal and Iran allowed determination of about of 41 elements: Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Hf, Ta, W, Sb, Au, Hg, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Lu, Th, U. Such a large group of elements, for the best of our knowledge, was determined in the medicinal plants for the first time. The results were interpreted in terms of excess, for example, of such elements as Se, Cr, Ca, Fe, Ni, Mo, and rare earth elements.

Conclusion & Significance: Among those elements thirteen dietary minerals (Ca, Cl, Co, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, S, V, Zn) and toxic elements (As, Ba, Cd, Sb) were detected. Possible connection between the medicinal properties and elemental content of the plants was established.

Recent Publications:

  1. Frontasyeva M.V. (2011) Neutron activation analysis for the Life Sciences. A review. Physics of Particles and Nuclei 42(2): 332-378.
  2. Peter Bode P., Robert R. Greenbergb R.R., De Nadai Fernandes E. A. (2009) Neutron Activation Analysis: A Primary (Ratio) Method to Determine SI-Traceable Values of Element Content in Complex Samples. Metrology in Chemistry, CHIMIA 63(10): 678-680.
  3. Baljinnyam N., Tsevegsuren N., Jugder B., Frontasyeva M.V., Pavlov S.S. (2014) Investigation of elemental content of some Mongolian medicinal plants. International Journal of Medicinal Plants. Photon, 106: 481-492 (IF 3.12).
  4. Li Xuesong, Hristozova G., Nekhoroshkov P.S. Frontasyeva M.V.  (2015) Neutron activation analysis of constituent elements of edible and medicinal plant of iron stick yam (Dioscorea opposita Thunb). Int. Research Journal of Public and Environmental Health 2(11):182-190.
  5. Kosior G., Prell M., Samecka-Cymerman A., Stankiewicz A., Kolon K., Kryza R., Brudzińska-Kosior A., Frontasyeva M., Kempers A. (2015) Metals in Tortula muralis from sandstone buildings in anurban agglomeration. Ecological Indicators 58: 122-131.

Shigeki Taga

Kurashiki Municipal Hospital, Japan

Title: A case of endometrial cancer presenting with malignant spinal cord compression

Time : 13:15-13:45

Speaker
Biography:

Taga is an obstetrician and gynecologist from Japan.  She is currently working in a hospital in Kurashiki City which is famous for its traditional Japanese town and a museum. This hospital is located near Seto Inland Sea, where we can see the beautiful sight. This hospital is not so big but important for the people. Taga experienced many cases in the field of obstetrics and gynecology, but this case was rather rare, so that she is interested in presenting it in this congress.

 

Abstract:

Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) is one of the most disabling complications of cancer metastasis and an oncological emergency requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment.

A 65-year-old woman presented with vaginal bleeding and a huge uterine tumour. Cytological test of uterine cervix was negative and that of the endometrium was not possible. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a heterogeneous solid tumour and uterine leiomyosarcoma was suspected. She underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Histopathologocal examination revealed mixed carcinoma (small cell carcinoma and endometrioid adenocarcinoma) of the endometrium. She presented with upper abdominal pain, back pain, cystoplegia and paraplegia of lower extremities postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bone metastasis with destruction of the eighth thoracic vertebral body as the sites of metastasis. She was diagnosed as having MSCC. Following administration of dexamethasone, she underwent vertebrectomy and posterior spinal fusion, and postoperative radiation therapy was performed to total of 20Gray in 4 fractions. The histopathological studies revealed malignant cells. We diagnosed this lesion as metastasis from endometrial cancer. However, her symptoms were not improved. Although she received two courses of systemic chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin, CT scan of the chest revealed new lung metastatic lesion, and she selected the best supportive care. She died 4 months after hysterectomy.

Recent Publications:

1.Bohm, P. and Huber, J. (2002) The surgical treatment of bony metastases of the spine and limbs. Journal of Bone &Joint Surgery( Br), 84,521-529.

2. Klimo, P. Jr. Kestle, JR. and Schmidt, M.H. (2004) Clinical trials and evidence-based medicine for metastatic spine disease. Neurosurg Clin N Am,15,549-564.

3. Klimo, P. Jr. and Schmidt, M.H. (2004) Surgical management of spinal metastasis. Oncologist,9,188-196.

 4. Loblaw, D.A., Perry J., Chambers, A. and Laperriere, N.J. (2005) Systematic review of the diagnosis and management of malignant extradural spinal cord compression: the Cancer Care Ontario Practice Guidelines Initiative's Neuro-Oncology Disease Site Group. Journal of clinical oncology, 23,2028-2037.

5.Schmidt,M.H., Klimo,P. Jr. and ,Vrionis, F.D.(2005) Metastatic spinal cord compression. Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 3,711-709.

Speaker
Biography:

Christian Milaster is a German engineer and Founder of the Ingenium Consulting Group, Inc. He is passionate about enabling the delivery of extraordinary care with a focus on creating effective and efficient Digital Health Transitions. Following his passion, Mr. Milaster partners with forward-thinking healthcare leaders to prepare their organizations for the future of healthcare delivery. Mr. Milaster’s expertise stems from a 30-year career, including 17 years in healthcare, at employers including IBM Global Services and the Mayo Clinic, and numerous digital health consulting engagements ranging from strategy development and business planning to the design and implementation of new healthcare services. He has designed and build sustainable healthcare delivery services that delight patients and improve outcomes, while exciting care providers. His communication methods and implementation skills have emboldened healthcare leaders to effectively execute visionary healthcare delivery strategies.

Abstract:

The technical developments over the past decades–especially those in the past 10 years–along with a demographic shift have given rise to a new type of patient: The Modern Healthcare Consumer. When today’s future patients can order books and other goods overnight, when they can watch virtually any movie from anywhere and when access to their personal, sensitive information (including their finances) is at their fingertips – then these consumers have expectations of their healthcare experience that most of today’s healthcare systems delivery organizations are not ready to satisfy, let alone exceed.

Combine this shift to consumerism with an exponential growth of treatment options, exploding healthcare cost, and a shift from sickness care to wellness care and it’s obvious to anyone, that new approaches to healthcare are needed.

Just like technological advances in energy production and the extraction of natural resources have averted the long-predicted energy crisis, technological advances can also come to the rescue in healthcare. But with so many technical solutions available, which aspects of digital health can help keep this perfect storm at bay?

This presentation examines the drivers behind the expectations of the New Healthcare Consumer and discusses which of the many digital health technologies can exceed the Modern Healthcare Consumer’s expectations, while improving health outcomes at a lower cost.

Recent Publications:

  1. “Just how mature is your health system’s telehealth program?” American Telemedicine Association Conference, April 2017 Orlando, Florida, USA.
  2. “Is the Dunning-Kruger Effect holding back your Telehealth Success?”, LinkedIn Post, April 2017, tiny.cc/ing-dunning.
  3. “Ending the Digital Health Confusion – A Digital Health Taxonomy”, Ingenium Telehealth Whitepaper, February 2017.
  4. “Ignorance, Inertia, Internal IT: Sabotaging Telehealth Success”, Weblog article, November 2016, tiny.cc/ing-ignorance.
  5. “Your Telehealth Business Plan: Don’t Leave Your Clinic Without It”, Florida Telehealth Summit, November 2016, Safety Harbor, FL, USA Alabama Telehealth Summit, May 2016, Birmingham, AL, USA GA Partnership for Telehealth, March 2016, Jekyll Island, GA, USA.

Speaker
Biography:

Buabbas has completed his PhD in Medical Informatics from Brunel University, London 2013. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University. He is interested in medical informatics research, including: informatics in pharmacy, nutrition, diagnostics imaging, and telemedicine. He has on-going research into the impact of Robotic Assisted Surgery (RAS) on surgeons and surgical patients. Dr. Buabbas has participated in several international conferences in his field.

 

 

Abstract:

Medical treatment overseas system in Kuwait costs the government a budget over 1.3 billion USD. Since 1998 the cost rose from 280 million USD to exceed 1.3 billion in 2015. A telemedicine system has the potential to reduce the number of Kuwaiti patients being sent abroad for treatment, and so reduce costs. Justifying the economic contributions for telemedicine is very important to confirm the cost benefits of its use. The cost analysis was performed to evaluate the costs of implementing a telemedicine system in Kuwait for overseas treatment patients, and then to calculate the results with the conventional way of sending patients abroad for treatment. The results showed that the estimated costs for three years using telemedicine with the conventional treatment abroad system had an economic impact, where potential savings could be 300 million per annum. Simplifying the calculation process around economic analysis of telemedicine has made the evaluation process successful. The study concluded that telemedicine can support the conventionally pathway financially and clinically as a way of health care delivery.

Recent Publications:

  1. Hanefeld J, Horsfall D, Lunt N, Smith R (2013). Medical Tourism: A Cost or Benefit to the NHS? PLoS ONE 8(10): e70406.
  2. Suzana, M., Mills, A., Tangcharoensathien, V., & Chongsuvivatwong, V. (2015). The economic burden of overseas medical treatment: a cross sectional study of Maldivian medical travelers. BMC Health Services Research, 15, 418.
  3. Akiyama, M., & Yoo, B.-K. (2016). A Systematic Review of the Economic Evaluation of Telemedicine in Japan. Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, 49(4), 183–196.
  4. Kouskoukis MN Botsaris CH (2017) Cost-Benefit Analysis of Telemedicine Systems/Units in Greek Remote Areas. PharmacoEconomics Open; 1:117–121
  5. De la Torre-Díez, I., López-Coronado, M., Vaca, C., Aguado, J. S., & de Castro, C. (2015). Cost-Utility and Cost-Effectiveness Studies of Telemedicine, Electronic, and Mobile Health Systems in the Literature: A Systematic Review. Telemedicine Journal and E-Health, 21(2), 81–85.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammad Mohsen Roostayi has been graduated with PhD degree from Tehran University of Medical Sciences as a physical therapist. He is an Assistant Professor at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and currently working as a Vice Chancellor (for education) of the rehabilitation school of the Shahid Beheshti University.

 

 

 

Abstract:

Cupping therapy has been widely used for clinical treatment of soft tissue lesions. The current study investigated the effects of cupping therapy on biomechanical properties of the skin in Wistar rats. 20 rats were divided into two groups: 10 in experimental and 10 in control group. Either the right or the left lower quadrants of the lumbar regions in the experimental group underwent 10 minutes daily cupping therapy for 12 days. The skin stiffness and ultimate tensile strength of all the rats were measured using tensiometer. The skin stiffness and ultimate tensile strength were decreased significantly in cupping side of the experimental group as compared with the non-cupping side and the control group. There were no significant differences between the non-cupping side of the experimental group and the control group. In conclusion, cupping therapy can be useful as a treatment method to reduce the skin stiffness and ultimate tensile strength.

Julia Schuler

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany

Title: Hydrothermal lignin liquefaction

Time : 16:10-16:30

Speaker
Biography:

Julia Schuler is born on 22nd January, 1988 in Heilbronn, Germany. Actually, she is doing her PhD at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at the Institute of catalytical research and technology.  She has a master degree of the University of Kaiserslautern (MSc Bioprocess Engineering University of Kaiserslautern). Before her master studies she studies process and environmental engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Heilbronn (B.Sc. Process & Environmental Engineering). She gained also experience at her study abroad at the University of Wollongong, Australia and at the Seoul National University, South Korea. She participated a lot of conferences (e.g. EUBCE 2016 plenary presentation, ECO BIO 2016, Conference in Kazan, Russia, etc.).

Abstract:

Hence, the focus of the presented work is to get a better knowledge of lignin as a starting material to produce chemicals. Therefore, the different influences of temperature and reaction times, the reaction pathways and the therefore necessary analytics need to be understood. But lignin brings a lot of challenges with it. The first is, that every lignin has a different composition, depending on the wood source and the degradation method applied to gain the lignin which has a significant influence on the lignin structure. And with this, a lot of changes come e.g. in the handling of the biomass.

To liquefy lignin towards high functional molecules, hydrothermal conditions are used.

To understand the challenges (reaction pathways, analytic, and so on) of lignin better it is important to have a look at different lignins and lignin sources, so to see if the behavior of lignin under several conditions are the same, and to see if with every lignin the same challenges are coming.  Therefore, different lignins were used, e.g. bark or a kraft lignin.

It is also considered that already degraded lignin products molecules repolymerise to oligomers, and so the yield of monomeric phenolic compounds decreases. To have an influence on this, different experiments are run. Fresh medium and feed get in contact with solutions directly after the hydrothermal liquefaction. The repolymersation shall be influenced and stopped through this and the yields of e.g. catechol shall get higher. Also this shall lead to a process for different biomasses, to gain platform chemicals. 

Recent Publications:

  1. D. Forchheim, U. Hornung, A. Kruse, and T. Sutter, “Kinetic Modelling of Hydrothermal Lignin Depolymerisation,” Waste and Biomass Valorization, no. February, pp. 1–10, 2014.
  2. A. Kruse and N. Dahmen, “Water - A magic solvent for biomass conversion,” J. Supercrit. Fluids, vol. 96, pp. 36–45, 2015.
  3. P. Schulze, A. Seidel-Morgenstern, H. Lorenz, M. Leschinsky, and G. Unkelbach, “Advanced process for precipitation of lignin from ethanol organosolv spent liquors,” Bioresour. Technol., vol. 199, pp. 128–134, 2016
  4. T. Faravelli, A. Frassoldati, G. Migliavacca, and E. Ranzi, “Detailed kinetic modeling of the thermal degradation of lignins,” Biomass and Bioenergy, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 290–301, 2010
  5. D. Forchheim, A. Kruse, “Optimization of the reaction parameters of a CSTR and a PFR ( Batch ) for the recovery of phenol from hydrothermal biomass liquefaction.”

Speaker
Biography:

Shahab Rezaian is a doctoral student of Information Systems at Advanced Informatics School (AIS), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. He completed his master’s degree in Management of Information Technology at Advanced Informatics School (AIS). His fields of interest are Health Information Systems, Hospital Information Systems, relation of Social issues and Hospital Information Systems Information and Information Systems Theory.

 

Abstract:

The present study was designed to provide an insight into nurses’ experiences and views, using a computerized hospital information system in clinical practice in a tertiary teaching hospital in southern Iran. The main aim of this pilot study was to determine the reliability and validity of those factors which can affect the successful implementation of Hospital Information System (HIS) for nursing staff and be used for another larger study including over 1000 full-time practicing nurses. One hundred sixty nurses participated in this study and voluntarily filled up a questionnaire containing 61 items related to demographic, work, work place and to various constructs of DeLone and McLean’s implementation success model as well as three additional constructs namely culture, trust and user quality. In our study the questionnaire items were based on literature reviews and experts’ opinions to ensure its content and construct validity. The reliability of all constructs’ measures were checked by Cronbach alpha coefficient which all but one were above the accepted level of 0.70 indicating that the measurement errors were small and the measurement instrument could be able to yield consistent results each time it is applied. Confirmatory factor analysis and factor loading were done for all items to confirm the dimensionality of the derived instrument. Forty-eight (94%) of dimension items except 3 had high values above 0.4, and over 39 (76%) of items had factor loadings above 0.7 which indicates an acceptably very high value of factor loading for the research instrument items. The 3 items with factor loading values less than 0.4, however turned to be candidates for omission from the future study. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dennis Rosenberg writes a Ph. D. dissertation on the effect of health-related social media use on health behavior changes. His dissertation includes theoretical framework from various fields of research: communication studies, information systems research, public health research and sociology. His studies are based on the data collected during his Ph.D. studies. He is interested in studying gender and ethnic differences in health-related use of social media and factors affecting sustained health-related use of social media. In addition, he studies various aspects of e-government use in Israel and different aspects of immigrants’ inclusion into a broader society (marriage patterns and intentions to stay in country).

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Online health participation relates to different aspects of active steps made online in order to elicit or provide information or support. Studies extensively investigate search for health information online. However, studies investigating health participation online are rare, so are the studies investigating this phenomenon on social media. Moreover, none of them considers gender differences regarding this phenomenon. In addition, these studies relate to health participation as a single phenomenon, whereas it is known that social media use is multidimensional.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: This study encountered between several hypotheses. First hypothesis is “absolute monopoly”, according to which women, who are known as dominant in search for online health information, will also be dominant on health participation domain. Second hypothesis, “areas of control”, argues that men are more active health participants than women. The third hypothesis is “democracy”, according to which there are no gender differences in health participation on social media. The data were collected through telephone survey of about 1000 respondents. Three aspects of health participation on social media were examined using binary logistic regression analysis: sharing own experience with coping with chronic health condition, discussing the work of health institutions and posting or commenting the health-related content.

Findings: The results mostly support the “democracy” hypothesis. No gender differences found in multivariate analysis. However, the bivariate analysis provided a little support for the “absolute monopoly” hypothesis. Women tend to post/comment the health-related content on social media more than men.

Conclusion & Significance: The health participation on social media is democratic in terms of gender. Women seem not succeeding in transformation of their dominance from search for health information area to the health participation domain. Conversely, men do not manage to establish dominance in this area of health-related social media use.

Recent Publications:

  1. Mano R, Rosenberg D (2014) Organizational restructuring, government control and loss of legitimacy following an organizational crisis: The case of Israel’s nonprofit human services. Journal of health and human services administration, 460 – 497.

Speaker
Biography:

Kiyomi Sakata has his expertise in epidemiology of chronic disease such as CVD, cancer, and osteoporosis and passion in preventing infectious disease such as influenza. He had studied epidemiology at the Epidemiology Research Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Houston Health Science Center. Awarded the degree of Master of Public Health in epidemiology for a thesis entitled “Changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors in three Japanese National Surveys 1971-1990” Work supervised by Professor Labarthe. Now he is a professor at the Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine in Japan.

 

Abstract:

Objective: A community-based intervention study was conducted to examine the effect of consumption of JCM 5805 yogurt on influenza incidence rates and the cumulative incidence rates among schoolchildren in Iwate Prefecture, Japan.

Methods: Schoolchildren and their parents in Shizukuishi town were told of the purpose, frequency and duration of JCM 5805 yogurt administration. The number of elementary schoolchildren in Shizukuishi town was 780 while that of junior high school students in Shizukuishi town numbered 475. The number of elementary schoolchildren in neigh-boring town A was 208 and that of junior high school students in town A was 121. JCM 5805 yogurt was delivered three times a week to all elementary schools and junior high schools in Shizukuishi town from January 16 through March 18, 2015. The incidence rate was calculated every week as the maximum case number divided by the number of schoolchildren in each school. The cumulative incidence rate was calculated as the total case number during the period when JCM 5805 yogurt was delivered divided by the number of schoolchildren in each school.

Results: JCM 5805 yogurt intake was associated with a two-thirds reduction in influenza incidence rates in Shizukuishi town schoolchildren compared with those of town A. Furthermore, the cumulative incidence rates of the elementary school and combined data from the elementary school and junior high school were significantly lower than those of neighbor town A.

Conclusion: JCM 5805 yogurt intake reduced both the incidence rates and cumulative incidence rates of influenza.

Recent Publications:

  1. Koeda Y, Tanaka F, Segawa T,  et al. (2016) Comparison between urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and urine protein dipstick testing for prevalence and ability to predict the risk for chronic kidney disease in the general population (Iwate-KENCO study): a prospective community-based cohort study. BMC Nephrology.  17(46):1-8.
  2. Sato T, Kishi M, Suda M, et al. (2017) Prevalence of Candida albicans and non-albicans on the tongue dorsa of elderly people living in a post-disaster area:a cross-sectional survey. BMC Oral Health. 17(51):1-10.
  3. Satoh A, Arima H, Ohkubo T, et al. (2017) Associations of socioeconomic status with prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in a general Japanese population: NIPPONDATA2010. J Hypertens. 35(2):401-408.

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Salomi has experience in research and training of programs and health applications. The main purpose of this study was to gather data and indicators about health process, through a literature review. She has demonstrated that in achieve these goals is important to observe the indicators that begin to point out positive evidence in the use of document management and process automation in a healthcare institution, through the Information and Communication Technologies in the e-Health system.

 

 

Abstract:

Health care management is essential to the financial balance of institutions and to the improvements of patient and organization documental processes. In order to achieve those aims, an important step is to observe the indicators that start to point out positive evidences when using document management and process automation in a health care institution, through Information and Communication Technologies in the e-Health system. The main purpose of this study was to gather data and indices about the issue under study, through a literature review. Analysis of American, European, and Brazilian articles in academic or non-academic health care organizations indicates share and use of patient’s data, that can improve applied systems performance; analysis of processes; indicators of quality of provided service and patient’s quality of care and safety; diagnosis and prescription of medications and decrease of data information errors, thus achieving level 7 in the Healthcare Informatics Management and Systems Society (HIMSS).

Recent Publications:
1. Moncho V. Hospital Marina Salud de Dénia. Leadings CIOs of Europe. A model for achieving HIMSS Stage 7. HIMSS CIO SUMMIT Europe / HIMSS Analytics Europe [Internet]. 2013 [cited 2014 July 05];5;12. Madri, Spain; 2013 Nov 12-14.
2. Moncho V. The Real Project starts with EMRAM Stage 7; HIMSS Turkey. 2014 June 4-5. Slide 11.
3. Parente S, McCullough J. Health information technology and patient safety: evidence from panel data. Health Affairs (Millwood) [Internet]. 2009 [cited 2014 Jun 21]; 28(2): 357-60.
4. McCullough JS, Casey M, Moscovice I, Prasad S. The Effect Of Health Information Technology On Quality in U.S. Hospitals Health Affairs 29. 2010 [cited 2014 Aug 18]; 29(4): 648-54.
5. Lopes PR, Ferreira DP. Padrões de normatização em informática em saúde. [Internet]. São Paulo: UNIFESP; 2014. 24 p. [citado 2014 Ago 20].

Speaker
Biography:

Mario Li is a student in the Department of Life Science at Queens University with a great passion for integrating medical research, education with modern technologies especially latest IT cloud computing technology. He is the founder of Cloud Healthcare Forum. He strongly believes that sharing and exchanging of ideas and knowledge, questioning, reasoning and discussing the existing healthcare system among academia, industries, government, patients and everyone who interested in healthcare all over the world is vital to solve the issues and improve the healthcare system. Working together, we can build modern health care.

Abstract:

This article introduces the design of healthcare road map/forum for healthcare professionals, medical device manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies and average people working together to modernize healthcare based on the modern IT technologies such as cloud computing technologies, elastic search and big data. The software platform allows healthcare professionals, medical device manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies and average people post ideas, real medical cases, solutions, new medical devices and medicines, discuss pros and cons, rate each of them and follow up to the issues and solutions interested. The platform is web based and consists of a web server, NoSQL database and a file server. The platform will be deployed and replicated locally in each of the continents in the private cloud network to achieve high performance, high scalability and reliability.

Recent Publications:
1. J. Marescaux, J. Leroy, F. Rubino, M. Smith, Michel Vix, M. Simone and D. Mutter, “Transcontinental Robot-Assisted Remote.
2. Telesurgery: Feasibility and Potential Applications” Annals of Surgery, Vol. 235, No. 4, pp. 487–492.
3. B. Jähne (2002). Digital Image Processing, Springer, 2002.
4. J. J. Christopher, H. K. Nehemiah, K. Arputharaj, G. L. Moses, "Computer-assisted Medical Decision-making System for Diagnosis of Urticaria", MDM POLICY & PRACTICE, July, 2016.
5. I. C. Cucoranu,"Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations" Clin Lab Med 36, 2016, pp51–56.

Speaker
Biography:

Atanas Vasilev a junior researcher at the Sector of Neutron Activation Analysis and Applied Research at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint institute for Nuclear Research (www.jinr.ru) int Dubna, Russia. He is an MSci in Biophysics of the Faculty of Physics in Sofia University, Bulgaria. Interest includes Life Sciences, nuclear and related analytical techniques used to study plant medicinal plants, environmental studies and statistics of large arrays of environmental data. Previous professional experience includes Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Plant Physiology and Genetics.

 

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Medicinal plants play a major role both in traditional and conventional medicine due to their natural abundance and variety of beneficial health effects. The wide use of plants brings up a necessity to understand their composition and evaluate the risks and benefits of consumption. Most of the studies dealing with medicinal plants are focused on complex constitutes such as antioxidants, enzymes, volatile oils and others. Unfortunately this trend of research leads to a lack of information regarding the elemental content of the medicinal plants.  Elemental content could be crucial in order to understand the health effects of the plants. This is due to the potential presence of two groups of elements: essential elements and toxic elements. Essential elements play a major role in human physiology and must be obtained by diet. The presence of toxic elements, on the other hand, might be hazardous to the consumer and lead to health problems.

The purpose of this Study: In the present work the elemental content of four widely used Bulgarian medicinal plants was studied in order to fill the aforementioned informational gap.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The elemental content of four Bulgarian   medicinal plants (Sanguisorba officialis L., Sideritis scardic Griseb, Chamaenerium angustifoliu L., and Tribulus terestris L.) was studied by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis. The studied plants are widely used in traditional Bulgarian medicine and have been reported to display healing properties. Previous information for their elemental composition is scarce.

Findings: The mass fractions of twenty eight elements  (Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, S, Sb,  Sc, Sr, Sm, Th, U, V, W, Zn) were determined.

Conclusion & Significance: Among those elements thirteen dietary minerals (Ca, Cl, Co, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, S, V, Zn) and four toxic (As, Ba, Cd, Sb) were detected.

Recent Publications:

  1. Frontasyeva M.V. (2011) Neutron activation analysis for the Life Sciences. A review. Physics of Particles and Nuclei 42(2): 332-378.
  2. Baljinnyam N., Tsevegsuren N., Jugder B., Frontasyeva M.V., Pavlov S.S. (2014) Investigation of elemental content of some Mongolian medicinal plants. International Journal of Medicinal Plants. Photon, 106: 481-492 (IF 3.12).
  3. Arnason J.T., Mata R. (2013) "Phytochemistry of Medicinal Plants". Springer Science & Business Medi
  4. Bogden John Klevay, Leslie M. (2000) Clinical nutrition of the essential trace elements and minerals: the guide for health professionals. Springer Science + Business Media New York.
  5. Lamari, Z., Larbi, R. & Negache, H. (2016) Trace element content of Zingiber officinalis and Salvia officinalis medicinal plants from Algeria. J Radioanal Nucl Chem 309(1): 17-22.